PW: egroj

domingo, 18 de febrero de 2018

Gary Burton • New Vibe Man In Town



Review by Scott Yanow
Vibraphonist Gary Burton's debut as a leader shows that he was a brilliant player from the start of his career. Utilizing a sparse trio that includes bassist Gene Cherico and drummer Joe Morello, Burton (even at this early stage) sounds quite original and unlike his predecessors (Lionel Hampton, Red Norvo, and Milt Jackson). Highlights include "Joy Spring," "You Stepped Out of a Dream," and Burton's original "Our Waltz." This boppish set is easily recommended.


Amos Milburn • Unreleased Masters



Organissimo ‎• B3tles (A Soulful Tribute To The Fab Four)



Guitarist Grant Green was one of the early birds on this: turning Beatles tunes into soulful jazz workouts, with his I Want to Hold Your Hand (Blue Note, 1965), featuring Hammond organ master Larry Young on the B3, recorded a little over a year after the Fab Four's musical invasion of America. But it was mostly a jazz standards/Great American Songbook outing, with only the opener/title tune nodding to the—ultimately—most influential of pop music groups.
Now, fifty years later, Organissimo goes all in, with B3tles, a CD full of Beatles tunes in a cool, soul jazz mode.
Jim Alfredson hold down the B3 chair, and adds the Wurlitzer and some synthesizer sounds to arsenal. He is joined by guitarist Lawrence Barris and drummer Randy Marsh, on a set that reinterprets these familiar tunes, sometimes injecting them with soul, sometimes taking them in unexpected directions.
The CD's cover art harkens to the cover of the Beatles first great album, their artistic breakthrough, Revolver (Capitol Records, 1966). With that it mind, the music starts fittingly with the Organissimo's version of George Harrison's "Taxman," the song that opened Revolver. Funky it is. The same for "Dig A Pony," a tune that seems made for the organ trio treatment. "Come Together"—that probably should have Chuck Berry added to Lennon McCartney tag for a songwriting credit, so you know it's got some hard-edged, Chess Records soul to it—sounds like a song the previously-mentioned Grant Green/Larry Young teaming should have tackled on a second recorded nod to the Beatles. But they couldn't have done it better or with more of a bluesy funk than Organissimo does.
"The Long And Winding Road" is lighter, more pop-ish in feel, buoyant and effervescent. "While My Guitar Gently Weeps," the George Harrison gem, takes things away from the soul atmosphere, slowing down the original's tempo, giving the song a beautiful, aching-in-the-bones sadness, leading into the set's closer, "Within You Without You," George Harrison's first full-on foray into Indian music. Organissimo's take is propulsive over dense drones, dense rhythms, and it sounds marvelously modern, on this outstanding and dynamic re-investigation of some classic Beatles tunes. ~Dan McClenaghan
https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/b3tles-a-soulful-tribute-to-the-fab-four/id1215481071


sábado, 17 de febrero de 2018

Roger King Mozian • El Twist





Joe Sample • Did You Feel That



Review by Jonathan Widran
There is some serious shaking going on in the studio here, and it appears the veteran Sample has found a great situation to let out his more aggressive edges. What must it be like to be a legend and try to somehow uncover a path you haven't driven on before? How can a cat like Sample top himself? It's always rewarding when a veteran artist twists expectations with a brand new sound, even if reaching into his past for the germ of the idea. Sample darts at the listener with a whole new, nonstop brass funk approach, allowing his all-star Soul Committee to lay down the grooves beneath his still plucky ivory spirit. Though Did You Feel That? cooks from start to finish, employing inventive rhythmic touches, simmering cool, and a flashy retro production style, it's sometimes too easy to compare the wild horn tandem of Oscar Brashear and Joel Peskin with old Sample cohorts Wilton Felder and Wayne Henderson. Sort of a Crusaders for the modern age. What shines through, however, is Sample's successful execution as a leader of a true ensemble, rather than just a slew of sessionaires. He takes some tasty solos, but makes sure that members of the Committee are allowed their own voices as they chime in with the Chairman of the Board. And just for the record, the other Committee members include drummer Steve Gadd, bassist Freddie Washington, guitarists Michael Landau and Arthur Adams, plus percussionist Lenny Castro. An added treat is the funky historical artwork, an Aaron Douglas painting called "Aspects of Negro Life" from "Slavery Through Reconstruction." It shows the joy of the culture, perfectly mirroring the excitement found on the album.


Montefiori Cocktail • Raccolta Nº 1



'Papa' John DeFrancesco • Walking Uptown



Review by Scott Yanow
Papa John DeFrancesco, the father of Joey DeFrancesco, is a talented organist himself. On this informal set with his quartet (which also includes tenor-saxophonist Tim Warfield, his other musical son, guitarist Johnny DeFrancesco, and drummer Glenn Ferracone), Papa John mostly sticks to the blues and bluish material. In addition to a swinging version of "Sunny," the gospel-ish "People Get Ready," the funky "160 Million Dollar Chinese Man" (from the remake of Ocean's 11), and a vamp piece ("What Happened"), there are four blues at various tempos and levels of funk. Joey DeFrancesco makes guest appearances on two tracks (one apiece on trumpet and piano) and bassist Paul Klinefelter is on one number but otherwise the basic quartet is showcased romping and stomping out their brand of soulful blues.